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What is the acid truth

Acid erosion, also known as Acid Wear, Tooth Erosion, or Enamel Erosion, is of growing concern and could quickly become the next big threat to the long-term health of our teeth – it’s a real challenge for the 21st century. Yet few people have ever heard of it.

Multiple studies support that modern acid-rich diets can cause acid erosion. In addition, the findings of a study, known as ESCARCEL, involving over 3,000 adults across Europe, were presented at a global dental conference in August 2013 in Istanbul. This ground-breaking research has revealed that acid erosion is increasingly prevalent.

Is fruit juice acidic
Are you at risk of acid erosion

Tooth Erosion is known to get worse over time, so this study is even more revealing as it shows that as many as 30% of young adults (18-35 years old) are showing some signs already.

We can’t see the early signs ourselves, but when a dentist is checking for tooth decay or tooth pain, they will also be looking for these 5 signs of Acid Erosion: weak, thin, transparent or see-through, yellowing and dull enamel.

As few as four acidic “occasions” throughout the day can put enamel at risk from Acid Erosion also known as Acid Wear.

It’s not just the carbonated beverages, coffee or wine. Surprisingly, it can even be our healthier choices: fruit, fruit juices, sparkling water with lemon, and even salad dressings can count towards our daily acidic “occasions.”

Revealing how today’s diet can affect our teeth.
That’s The Acid Truth.

Enamel and
Acid Erosion

Enamel is the white, mineral-rich protective outer layer of our teeth. It’s not just strong, it’s the hardest substance in our bodies. Surprisingly though, enamel can be weakened or softened just by the acids found in our everyday food and drink. If weakened, our enamel can then be more easily worn away, even during regular brushing. Over time, it can get gradually thinner, duller and see-through – eventually revealing the yellow layer underneath.

Normally, saliva helps neutralize acidity found in food and works to restore the natural balance of our mouths, while slowly re-hardening tooth enamel. Due to the acidity of our modern healthy diet, saliva doesn’t always neutralize acidity or re-harden tooth enamel fast enough.

Tooth Erosion can be described as the loss of tooth substance (i.e. enamel) and is different from Tooth Decay. It can be caused by either mechanical (e.g. grinding) or chemical (e.g. dietary acids) challenges. Tooth Erosion, also known as Acid Erosion, is the wearing away of enamel often due to dietary acids.

How much of your diet affects tooth enamel